Multilingual Leaf: Finally, the Missing Link Between SiteTree and WPML

A new WordPress plugin has just bloomed into the Interweb, an add-on addressed to SiteTree's lovers who have based their multilingual website upon WPML. Its name is Multilingual Leaf, and it is only awaiting to be discovered.

It was back in June 2013 when I received the first public request of lighting up the cooperation flame between SiteTree and the WPML plugin. And though at the time I had been snatched away from the SiteTree project by the toughest period of my young life, the call for help wasn't disregarded, quite the opposite, it is exactly one of the reasons why I am introducing Multilingual Leaf.

Contrary to what I'm used to do, this time around I couldn't openly hand my brainchild, but I trust that the price at which I'm offering Multilingual Leaf will be perceived as a honest proposal of mutual aid.

The Missing Link

Without Multilingual Leaf, SiteTree is plainly unable to discern the difference between URLs in the site's original language and those belonging to localised web pages, in other words, SiteTree and chaos go side by side when it comes to running on a multilingual website powered by WPML.

The need for a solution was throbbing.

Multilingual Leaf isn't just aimed to turn your Site Tree, multilingual, but also to introduce useful language information in the Google Sitemap, and to prevent out-of-context permalinks from polluting the Google News Sitemap. In the Leaf's page you may read in detail about its features.

Feedbacks, Wanted

On closing a development cycle, I have always the feeling that I could have done something, better. Perhaps it's just my impulse to overdo... Whatever the reason, I firmly believe that when the desire to improve awakens, feedbacks are way more than a starting point, they are a spur. Yours too.